Saturday, December 29, 2012

Tamar's Knitted Infinity Scarf DIY


The past week has been full of fun with family and friends, but I'm beginning to miss this blog and my sewing machines back in the city. Since it's going to be another week before I'm reunited with my sweeties and can start sewing again, there will be more knitting and style posts than usual over the course of next week.

Knitting is actually my second most favorite craft next to sewing. Every year I get the knitting itch as soon as the weather gets colder. Oddly, that didn't happen this year, and my knitting urge didn't kick in until November. I guess I had some catching up to do, because in December I've already knitted a hat for Anneliis, a scarf and wrist warmers for my teachers, and this cozy infinity scarf for Tamar as a Christmas present.


Since this infinity scarf was so simple in design, I thought I'd share the knitting process with you, so you could recreate it if you'd like. This would make a great first knitting project because it's pretty fool proof and uses only the very basic knitting techniques and stitches.

Click "read more" below to see the full pattern.

Happy knitting!





Tamar's Infinity Scarf

Skill level: beginner
Needles: I used European size 6mm circular needles, but you can use any size depending on how chunky you want the knit to be. I'd recommend needle size > 4mm though.
Gauge: I hate checking for gauge, so I usually end up calculating the right number of stitches from my knitted swatch. And with this simple pattern, I'd recommend you do, too.

Instructions:

Start with knitting a sample swatch. Cast on about 25 stitches and work in knit stitch (knitting even rows and purling odd rows) for a few rows ( about 7-10 would suffice). Now you can measure your gauge. Take a ruler and count how many stitches fit into 10 cm of knit.
Now take a tape measurer and measure the desired  length of your infinity scarf. You should get a similar equation:

NOTE! This is simply an example, not the suggested number of cast ons. You should put in your own numbers to get the correct number of cast ons.

10 cm of knit = 12 sts
260 cm (length of infinity scarf) = ? sts
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260x12/10= 312

In this case you should cast 312 stitches for your infinity scarf.

Please check your gauge!

The scarf in knitted round with circular needles, so that the initial number of stitches will make up the length of the scarf and the number of rows will determine the hight of the scarf. This way you can easily customize the length and the hight as you wish.

Once you've cast the number of stitches needed for your desired scarf length, connect the beginning and the end of the row and start working in circles.
1st row: knit (k) all stitches (sts)
2nd row: purl (p) all sts
3rd row: k all sts
4th row: p all sts
5th row: k all sts
6th row: p all sts
7th - 10th row: k all sts
11th - 13th row: p all sts
14th - 18th row: k all sts
work in a similar manner, knitting 3-6 rows and then purling 3-5 rows until you are 3-4 cm away from your desired hight. Then work rows 1-6 again to end the scarf. Be aware that this type of pattern will shorten the hight of the scarf naturally, so make the hight a few rows higher to compensate.
Last row: loosely bind off. There's 2 ways to do this:  *knit 2 together, slip sts back on the right hand needle*, *repeat*. OR knit 2, slip first sts over second, *knit 1, slip previous sts over knitted stitch*, *repeat*.

That's it! You're done and should now have a fabulously cozy infinity scarf.


If you have any questions, don't hesitate to ask in the comments! I always do my best to clarify and follow up on your questions.

46 comments:

  1. I think this project turned out wonderfully. I am not much of a knitter, but I might just have to try this and sharpen my skills. Looks super cozy!

    Callie
    www.coffeeandcardigans.com

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    Replies
    1. Callie, it's super easy! If you've ever knitted in your life you should master this perfectly.

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    2. Could you please recommend a particular type of yarn, fiber, or brand? Where do you find a circular needle that will accommodate 250 stitches?

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    3. I will comment on the yarn type below, but as for the needles, I used standard 80cm long circular needles. It's a bit tedious moving that many stitches around as they are pretty tight and the work gets heavier by the row, but all in all, it was smooth knitting.

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    4. This comment has been removed by the author.

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    5. Seeha, please read my reply @beachkoz :), and I used about 300g of yarn.

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  2. That is really lovely - it's so difficult to find crafty boy things to do and this fits the bill perfectly!

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    Replies
    1. I agree! It's always hard to find things do make for him. I think practical is what they need.

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  3. Kuule, päris kobe modell sul salli näitamiseks.

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  4. This is so cute. THanks for sharing.
    Mingz Eclectic Creations
    http://peaceloveoliveoil.blogspot.com

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  5. I am starting this tomorrow! Looks great

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  6. How long were your circular needles? Will 36 inches work? Or should I go for a shorter one (like 29 inches?)

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    Replies
    1. If your needles are shorter than your scarf length you should be fine.

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  7. Question. Do I increase knitting part and pearling part by 1 after each section?
    I've done knit 4rounds, pearl 3 rounds, knit 5 rounds, pearl 4 rounds. Do I do 6 knit rounds now and 5 pearl rounds?
    Thanks.

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    Replies
    1. Good question! There's actually no set number of purl and knit rounds. I would suggest not to increase the number of rows as you go along, but to vary the number. You could continue with knitting 4 rounds and then purling 3, and then knitting 3 and purling 4 rounds. The number is not that important, as long as you knit a few rounds and then purl a few rounds. My numbers were just an example.

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  8. Question. Do I increase knitting part and pearling part by 1 after each section?
    I've done knit 4rounds, pearl 3 rounds, knit 5 rounds, pearl 4 rounds. Do I do 6 knit rounds now and 5 pearl rounds?
    Thanks.

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  9. How many inches/cm did you knit before you cast off?
    Thanks

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    Replies
    1. I knitted 18 cm and finished it then because I ran out of yarn. But, now that Tamar's worn it, I would recommend knitting an extra 4-5cm. So, 22-25cm in total would be perfect I think.

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  10. Hi Hanna-
    Excited to try this-how much yarn did you use?
    Thanks! Tammie

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    Replies
    1. I used a little over 200g, about 250g I think. Hope this helps! Happy knitting!

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  11. quick question when u finish the 18 steps do i repeat it again??

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    1. After the 18th row, you should work on in a similar manner like you did in rows 7-18, purling a few rows and the knitting a few rows. You could repeat rows 7-18 exactly if you want to as many times as needed for your scarf to the hight/width you want, and then repeat rows 1-6 at the end. Hope this helps!

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    2. thx for the fast reply n the help =]

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  12. Replies
    1. The number of cast ons depends on the desired length of your scarf and the gauge of your yarn. I've explained the mathematics above, but the basic point is that the thinner the yarn the more cast ons, the thicker the yarn the fewer cast ons. Because your scarf length (how many times you can wrap it around your neck) depends on the number of stitches on your needles, you should really take the time to check your gauge and then calculate the number of cast ons you need. It's not an exact science as the scarf does stretch a bit, but it's important to do the math before starting, because you can't alter the length of your scarf later on. Hope this helps a little in figuring it out! If you have any more questions, let me know.

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  13. Hi...this is a great scarf....what type of yarn did you use?

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Monika! Read my reply @beachkoz :)

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  14. how many inches long for the circular needle? I love circular needles - though I'll have to work on my purling, it's been a while!

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    Replies
    1. I love circulars as well! They're far more comfortable to work with than regular needles. I used 80cm long circular needles, that should be about 32 inches.

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  15. Really nice. I know my son in Utah would like this very much. I, too, would like to know type of yarn and how much.

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    1. I hope your son gets his scarf then ;). As for the yarn type, I really can't remember what I used, but anything that has the expected gauge (written on the label) of 12-15 stitches per 10 cm should work, as long as it's a chunky yarn. Or, you could use something thinner and simply knit 2 strands together. I used about 250g of yarn, but I would suggest stocking up at least 300g.

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  16. Well, I made this and only did 400 stitches on the needles suggested to get a 6ft scarf, ended up being almost 12 feet long.....I'm pulling it back apart and I cut the stitches in half, so 175 should be about right...not really sure what happened.

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    1. So sorry that happened to you! I actually never suggested the number of cast ons. I simply illustrated the math with a random set of numbers. 520 cast ons for 2.6 meters would only apply IF the gauge of your yarn is 5cm=10 stitches/10cm=20 sts. If that is not the case, and for example the gauge of your yarn is 10cm=13 sts, then for 6ft (which is 183 cm) the math goes like this: 183x13/10=237.9 (rounded to 238 stitches).
      I hope this clears it a bit. All the best and happy knitting!

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  17. Do you use the circular needles the same way you would straight needles... meaning do you 'turn around and go the other way' when you reach the end of your row? (This would mean you would sew the ends together after knitting is finished)?

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    1. The cowl is knitted in rounds, meaning in circles rather than back and forth.This omits the need to make a seam to the scarf. So much neater this way, I think.

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  18. This comment has been removed by the author.

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  19. I'm just wondering if your calculated length of the scarf, 260cm, was the length of the scarf when it was doubled? Because it's an infinity scarf, how does this affect the length?

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    1. As I said in the instructions, you should calculate your own measurements, because you might like your infinity scarf to go round your neck only once, or perhaps twice. I made mine so that it went around Tamar's neck 3 times. And the measurement indicates the circumference of the infinity scarf, not the scarf folded in half.

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  20. hi i'm very new to knitting and soo confused with the math lol if you cast on 25 stitches for 10 rows how do you only get 12 stitches. I did understand the the thicker the wool the less stitches .can i cast on stitches until i get the length i like? how many stitches did you use? thank you

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    1. Hi there! I understand your confusion. So, you cast on 25 stitches for the sample swatch. You should always knit a sample swatch first to check for gauge. Now, I usually knit my sample about 10 rows to get a clear picture of the knit. Sometimes I'll decide to switch needle size after knitting the swatch if i see that the knit is too loose or too tight. The 25 stitches doesn't have to equal 10 cm. Depending on the yarn thickness, it could also be 20cm. Do you get it?
      So, once I've knitted the sample, I take a ruler and put it on the sample horizontally and count the number of stitches that fit into 10 cm. That's where the 12 stitches came from in my example. The rest is simple elementary school math: If there are 12 stitches per 10 cm, how many stitches are there per 260cm (or whatever is your desired scarf length). Oh, and the scarf length in this case is actually the scarf width aka the circumference of the scarf since this is a circle scarf.
      You can never tell the final width of the knit from the initial width of the cast ons, since the first row will always stretch quite a bit longer.
      I hope this made things a little bit clearer! If you have any other questions, don't hesitate to ask. We've all been beginners at some point :)

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  21. Hanna- what length of circular needle did you use for this?

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    1. I used standard 80cm long circular needles.

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